Postpartum

Exercise after a C-section | What you need to know

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Having a cesarean can be a frightening ordeal and getting your body back after the incision is made is a whole other story.

During postpartum recovery, many women find it difficult to start exercise after a C-section.

The pain and discomfort in the mid-section can be daunting.

However, studies show the quicker you get up and walk and start moving, the better off you will be.

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Exercise After a C-section Timeline

Today, in many hospitals, they even have your stand and walk within hours of surgery. This may seem crazy, but it’s been proven to help to women around the globe recover faster.

But, before you start exercising after a cesarian make sure your body is ready to workout after baby and that you keep a realistic time line in mind.

 

The First Few Days

The first few days after your c-section you may feel tired, stressed and in some discomfort from the healing process.

It is important to take it easy and not try to over do it. Your doctors will want to see you walking and moving, but just be cautious not to go too wild. Your body needs some time to recover.

Pssst…If you haven’t check out The Postpartum Cure, I highly recommend it! It’s one of the best postpartum recovery programs out there. Many of my readers have tried it and they are loving it! Just watch her intro video. I know I related to all the same struggles, and I bet you’ll relate to a few too!

 

Week 1-3 After a C-section

Your doctor or healthcare provider may encourage you to begin with light walking as exercise to begin with, as this help the healing process.

When you walk, it helps your circulatory system, your muscles and your spirit. Even doing light exercise can give you those feel good endorphins.

Many new moms get stuck in a stooping posture after a c-section. It’s normal to try to safe gaurd your tummy due to the pain and fear of something happening, but avoid getting into this habit.

Be aware of your posture and try to remind yourself to stand up straight as often as possible.

The bad posture not only leads to back pain, but can cause problems with your abdominal muscles as you start to heal postpartum.

 

Weeks 4 & 5

You may be feeling a little feisty and ready to get back to the grind at this point.

It is common for moms to get a little stir crazy and want to get their pre-pregnant body back.

This is a good feeling, however, temper that with moderation. Remember, your body just went through a lot of work and trauma, so don’t go too fast.

This is a good time to start doing pelvic floor exercises, light walking for cardio and even some light yoga poses to regain your center of balance.

Remember, your joints and ligaments will be soft for up to five months postpartum (due to pregnancy hormones) so step carefully to ensure you don’t fall or injure your knees!

 

Weeks Six to Eight

Now is the time when many moms get into a groove with their newborn.

If you have other kids on the ground, you may feel overwhelmed and a little tired.

But, keep up with your walking routine and pelvic floor exercises.

This will support you when you get the all-clear from your doctor to do more exercise.

Now is a good time to push a stroller if you like and walk a little farther than before.

Continue to do your pelvic floor exercises and work toward doing some yoga stretches.

Make sure to warm up and stretch before your walks.

You may feel very tired after only a few minutes of walking, but each day you should feel a little stronger, and able to go a little further before feeling this way.

Some women experience diastasis recti, which is a separation of the abs, following a cesarean.

This can cause pain in the lower back and pelvic region.

There are certain exercises to avoid such as sit-ups, planks and straight-leg raises as it could worsen any diastasis recti.

Don’t be alarmed, as this can usually be treated with rehabilitative exercise and time.

How to get a flat stomach after baby.

Before starting any type of exercise after a c-section, check with your doctor.

They may recommend waiting until you are 4-6 months after surgery to do any type of abdominal exercises.

Working out after a cesarean can be very rewarding for new moms.

Getting to reconnect with your core and center of gravity can be challenging so take your time and enjoy the journey.

Make sure if you have any questions about what you can and can’t do to consult with your doctor or healthcare professional so that you are gentle on your body.

As the weeks go by, you will start to get your body back in a matter of time.

 

What I Recommend to Make Your Postpartum Easier

If you’re serious about healing your body after your baby is born, you will want to check out this course called The Postpartum Cure.

It is AMAZING. When I heard about it, I just had to check it out. I didn’t have high expectations for this class, but I was so wrong.

Katie, who created this course, had a very real struggle postpartum too.

She will help you figure out how to regain your core strength, fix your pelvic floor, what you should eat to heal faster and even how to hold your baby and fix your posture so your not damaging your body worse postpartum.

She also has recipes, printable grocery lists and gives you tips to make the process as easy as possible!

You can check out the program here and regain your strength back quicker after pregnancy.

 

Other Articles You’ll Like

8 Postpartum Recovery Tips to Heal Faster After Birth
Postpartum Snacks to Pump Up Your Milk Supply While Shedding the Baby Weight
Is Your Body Ready to Work out Postpartum?
How to Get a Flat Stomach After Baby and Why Crunches Are BAD for You
Fixing the Dreaded Diastasis Recti

Exercise after c-section. What you need to know about your postpartum body after surgery. How to start losing the baby weight and getting your body back after a cesarean. Postpartum fitness.

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